Imagining Futures

This document by no means addresses all of the multiple and intersecting barriers in achieving food justice, yet we hope we all come away with more knowledge and passion towards fighting for the right to nutritious food for everyone. As Tananarive Due states in the closing of Octavia’s Brood,

We hold so many worlds inside us. So many futures. It is our radical responsibility to share these worlds, to plant them in the soil of our society as seeds for the type of justice we want and need. It has been beautiful to gather and share these stories, collaboratively edit them, and begin to understand not just the challenges we face or the enemies we need to transform, but the abundance of imagination we in the social justice real hold, and must cultivate. (279)  

We live in world in which systems create situations where there are, “Several families crowded in a single home because of the inability to find work and a system of de facto slavery by companies that hire workers at pitiful wages in exchange for food, shelter, and safety” (Due, 191).  These situations are not isolated events, but systemic occurrences.  The system is not broken, it is working exactly as intended, and perhaps reformism is not enough.  As Stephen Dillon explains, beliefs in reformism are beliefs “tied to the immunity of whiteness from structural forms of racial violence, regulation, and social death” (Dillon 2013, 41).  Our visionary fiction moves beyond such beliefs and instead into the powers of imagination, hope, and resistance.   To us, this is the most important element of our project; as Mia McKenzie explains in Black Girl Dangerous,

Alice Walker wrote that resistance is the secret of joy.  I think that is true for people of color, for queers, for all of us whose lives are deemed less valuable in a hateful world run by evil people.  Resistance comes in many, many forms.  It comes in the throwing of bricks, but not only in the throwing of bricks.  It comes, most often, in quieter, less media-worthy ways… (60)

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